meditation

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Can you feel the Qi? or Energy?

This is a question that is rarely asked. However, I know everyone wants to ask it. Can you feel it? What does it feel like? What am I suppose to feel? First, what is Qi?  Qi is the universal energy force that flows through everything.  Like water, it flows freely around us, and through our bodies via energy channels or meridians.    We can manipulate this energy by practicing qigong, tai chi or yoga.  All these energy practices move your energy.   For more, read my blog post What is Qi. Can I feel the Qi? Yes, I feel it. Did I always feel it? No, I did not always feel the qi. What does it feel like? People report different sensations. I can report the following: After performing some of the 18 Luohan hands I feel the Qi rushing to my hands, it feels like tingling and sometimes the hands feel like they are swelling (but they are not - nothing you can see). Other times, when I am practicing a step in the 5 step routine called "flowing breeze swaying willow" I feel the Qi spiraling up, and my whole body wants to follow the spiral. Other times it feels like a subtle wave going through my whole body. The thing to remember about qi is it is very subtle, and gentle. Often I feel qi as heat. Lots of heat. No, it is not a hot flash. Those are very different. The heat from Qi is gradual, and not as intense as a hot flash. No nausea, or sweating. So how do you learn to feel the Qi? The only way is to practice. Do your very best to enter zen and go [...]

By |April 12th, 2018|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

What are the 18 Luohan Hands?

Here is an introduction to the history, philosophy, and practice of The 18 Luohan Hands. In romanized Chinese, the 18 Luohan Hands is written Shiba Luohan Shou, which is pronounced as follows: • Shi (like the word “ship” but without the “p”) • Ba (rhymes with “La”, ) • Luo (rhymes with “claw”) • Han (rhymes with “con”) • Shou (sounds like “show”) The word Luohan comes from the Sanskrit word Arhat. Both words refer to a person who has cultivated a high level of spirituality. After the Buddha passed away roughly 2500 years ago, 500 of his top disciples gathered together in a grand council. Together, they reviewed and discussed his teachings word by word. These disciples became known as the 500 Arhats. 
When Buddhism spread from India to China, there were some cultural adjustments. For example, the Chinese paid special homage to 18 of the 500 Arhats. Statues of these 18 Luohan are often found in Buddhist temples today. 
When Bodhidharma taught at the Shaolin Temple (roughly 1000 years after the passing of the Buddha), he chose to pay homage to these 18 Luohan, perhaps in an effort to reach across the cultural divide. So he named a set of Qigong techniques after them. 
The word Shou means “hands”, but refers to the 18 techniques. So a figurative translation would be the 18 Techniques of the Enlightened Ones. Over time, the 18 Luohan Hands evolved into the 18 Luohan Fists. Here, “fists” also refers to the techniques, but implies that they are not just for health. In other words, it was a form of Kung Fu. This was the birth of Shaolin Kung Fu, a martial art that would become legendary. The 18 [...]

What is Qi?

Qi pronounced chi, is the universal life force that runs through everything. Qi is the life force which sustains every activity of the body, mind and spirit. If you practice yoga, you know this energy as prana, if you are familiar with Shiatsu you know it as Ki. The Chinese are the leaders in knowledge of this life force. Chinese doctors have mapped the energy system of the body. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is based on balancing and enhancing these energies in the body. TCM and Qigong have been in use to enhance health for over 5000 years. Your Qi can be enhanced with herbs, food, acupuncture, and Qigong. What is Qigong?  Qigong, pronounced Chi Kung consists of static postures, moving postures, and meditation. There are numerous studies that confirm the benefits of Qigong and many more are available in Chinese. In China, qigong exercises are done daily in school to prevent the need for eye glasses. People practice Qigong for health, to learn about themselves, and to learn how to follow the breath to find peace. According to TCM theory, we need to protect our life force and ensure it is flowing freely. In order to do that we need to eat properly, spend time in nature, and move the energetic body. Qigong exercises or movements are designed to move the energy through the energy meridians, transform energy, and store energy. Where does Qi or energy come from?  Your original Qi comes from your parents – we are born with an energy body, we obtain Qi from food, the air, earth and the heavens (planets & stars).   Qi is the life force – without it, there is no life.  As we age, our energy [...]

By |February 11th, 2018|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Shooting Arrows # 2 of the 18 Luohan hands

Shooting Arrows This movement is one of the most challenging to learn.  It uses the one finger zen hand form, which is a special Shaolin technique that brings energy to the hands and index finger.  The movement begins with the arms crossed in a horse stance, and the hands in the one finger zen position.  You then alternate stepping to the side and shooting an arrow to the opposite side.  This movement is best learned from a teacher and practiced many times.   Practicing shooting arrows sends energy to the lung and heart meridians.  It is useful for skin problems, respiratory issues, high blood pressure, depression, self confidence and memory issues.  

The Five Yin Organ Routine

  The five organ routine is a very powerful set of Qigong movements that move energy through the kidneys, lungs, heart, liver and spleen.  These are very important organs that work in harmony to sustain life.   When one of these organs is not functioning optimally it will affect the others.   The five yin organ routine is designed to disperse/release toxic Qi and collect/send healing energizing Qi to the five yin organs. Why do we want to ensure energy is flowing freely through these 5 organs? According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), the five are connected and when there is an energy block or disturbance in one, there can be a domino affect. Energy disturbances can occur from external sources and from unprocessed emotions. To read more about these 5 organs from a TCM perspective click here The five yin organs are easily disrupted by the seven emotions (anger, joy, worry, grief, sadness, fear, and shock) than are the Yang organs. The emotions are said to be the primal force behind energy transformation; however, each person will have different reaction to emotional changes, based on his or her dominant elemental pattern. Each organ has an element associated with it, and each person has a dominant element. Below are the seven emotions, the corresponding organ, and the element. 1. Anger - Liver -Wood Symptoms of disharmony include, blurred vision, headaches, high blood pressure, insomnia. 2. Joy - Heart - Fire Symptoms of disharmony include anxiety, insomnia, elbow problems, obsessive compulsive disorders 3. Worry - Spleen - Earth Symptoms of disharmony include, nausea, weight loss, belching and easy bruising. 4. Grief and Sorrow - Lungs - Metal Symptoms of disharmony often appear on the skin in the [...]

By |August 28th, 2017|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Plucking Stars Exercise # 3 of the 18 Luohan Hands

Plucking Stars Plucking Stars is a simple movement that requires you to reach for the stars with one hand while pressing down with the other hand. Plucking stars improves digestion by bringing energy to the spleen and stomach meridians. According to Chinese medical theory and western medicine, good digestion is essential for good health and vitality. Plucking stars can help with virtually any digestive problem. Add plucking stars to your routine to help with indigestion, acid reflux, diarrhea, constipation, diabetes, liver and gallbladder problems, Crohn’s disease, diverticulosis, tennis elbow, endometriosis, yeast infections, dysmenorrhea, vaginitis and ovarian cysts. In addition, plucking stars opens up the 8 Extraordinary Meridians along the sides of the body, these are important energy reservoirs.   Learn more about the Extraordinary Meridians in a future blog post.

Five Reasons to Try Qigong

Carrying Mountains one of the 18 Luohan Hands   Movement is medicine! Did you know that the single most important thing you can do for your health is move more everyday!  I believe that movement is medicine, taken daily you can ward off most ailments including aging.  I love to move, and want to share one of my favourite movement medicines Qigong to all who are interested. Easy to do and restores health: Half of the population in Canada is not active enough for health.  People claim they don’t have time. Qigong can be practiced anywhere, anytime, for any length of time - inside or out, and no props are required…just YOU!  For best results aim for 30 minutes a day. Endorsed by research!  The Harvard School of Medicine has endorsed Qigong.  In a recent review, Harvard researchers cited the following improvements from practicing Tai Chi and Qigong. Some of my students have seen improvements, like less pain, lower blood pressure, increased sex drive, and no more heart burn, in as little as 2 weeks. Manage stress: Qigong is a form of dynamic meditation where you calm the mind, breathe into the poses and follow the flow of energy through your body.   When you practice Qigong, your internal chemistry, and energy function optimally. Qigong builds mental and emotional strength while teaching the body to react in a positive way to stress. Treat, manage or prevent disease! Qigong is a branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine.  Qigong movements are a form of medicine each movement encourages the flow of Qi, the circulating life force (or energy) that circulates via meridians throughout your body.   According to Chinese medicine when the meridians are blocked or if the energy is [...]