Blog

Home/Blog

Shooting Arrows # 2 of the 18 Luohan hands

Shooting Arrows This movement is one of the most challenging to learn.  It uses the one finger zen hand form, which is a special Shaolin technique that brings energy to the hands and index finger.  The movement begins with the arms crossed in a horse stance, and the hands in the one finger zen position.  You then alternate stepping to the side and shooting an arrow to the opposite side.  This movement is best learned from a teacher and practiced many times.   Practicing shooting arrows sends energy to the lung and heart meridians.  It is useful for skin problems, respiratory issues, high blood pressure, depression, self confidence and memory issues.  

The Five Yin Organ Routine

  The five organ routine is a very powerful set of Qigong movements that move energy through the kidneys, lungs, heart, liver and spleen.  These are very important organs that work in harmony to sustain life.   When one of these organs is not functioning optimally it will affect the others.   The five yin organ routine is designed to disperse/release toxic Qi and collect/send healing energizing Qi to the five yin organs. Why do we want to ensure energy is flowing freely through these 5 organs? According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), the five are connected and when there is an energy block or disturbance in one, there can be a domino affect. Energy disturbances can occur from external sources and from unprocessed emotions. To read more about these 5 organs from a TCM perspective click here The five yin organs are easily disrupted by the seven emotions (anger, joy, worry, grief, sadness, fear, and shock) than are the Yang organs. The emotions are said to be the primal force behind energy transformation; however, each person will have different reaction to emotional changes, based on his or her dominant elemental pattern. Each organ has an element associated with it, and each person has a dominant element. Below are the seven emotions, the corresponding organ, and the element. 1. Anger - Liver -Wood Symptoms of disharmony include, blurred vision, headaches, high blood pressure, insomnia. 2. Joy - Heart - Fire Symptoms of disharmony include anxiety, insomnia, elbow problems, obsessive compulsive disorders 3. Worry - Spleen - Earth Symptoms of disharmony include, nausea, weight loss, belching and easy bruising. 4. Grief and Sorrow - Lungs - Metal Symptoms of disharmony often appear on the skin in the [...]

By |August 28th, 2017|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Plucking Stars Exercise # 3 of the 18 Luohan Hands

Plucking Stars Plucking Stars is a simple movement that requires you to reach for the stars with one hand while pressing down with the other hand. Plucking stars improves digestion by bringing energy to the spleen and stomach meridians. According to Chinese medical theory and western medicine, good digestion is essential for good health and vitality. Plucking stars can help with virtually any digestive problem. Add plucking stars to your routine to help with indigestion, acid reflux, diarrhea, constipation, diabetes, liver and gallbladder problems, Crohn’s disease, diverticulosis, tennis elbow, endometriosis, yeast infections, dysmenorrhea, vaginitis and ovarian cysts. In addition, plucking stars opens up the 8 Extraordinary Meridians along the sides of the body, these are important energy reservoirs.   Learn more about the Extraordinary Meridians in a future blog post.

5 Reasons to Learn Qigong from Monica Marquis

I practice daily! This is a feat in of itself.  Half of the population in Canada is not active enough for health.  In addition to my Qigong practice I swim, walk, hike, inline skate, and cycle. I am passionate about movement and believe movement is medicine, taken daily you can ward off most ailments including aging. I am a fitness and physical activity specialist with 20+ years of experience.   I have many certifications including: aquafitness (instructor, trainer, therapist),  Bone fit certified, Watsu 1,11,111, Ahi chi, Tai chi, Yoga, Medical Qigong & Qigong teacher training. I am a health promotion specialist who worked in public health promoting physical activity and chronic disease prevention. I also coordinated the Mississauga Halton Fall Prevention Initiative and promoted best practices in fall prevention to everyone who works with older adults.  I ended my career in the healthcare sector after spending 18 months with Osteoporosis Canada.  Where I encouraged health care professionals to implement best practices in Osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment.   So, I know chronic illness, if I don’t know, I am good at finding out causes, treatment and best practices.  In addition, I am very good at finding best practice research and summarizing it for the general public.  I have delved into many alternative therapies and find many of them very useful. I am a health professional gone ROGUE! Why rogue?  Because I believe in alternative medicine.  I believe movement is medicine.   I am sick of how long it takes to get anything done in health care.  I cannot be a change agent in that environment anymore.  I am content sharing my love of movement and promoting one of my favourite movement medicines – Qigong to all who are [...]

By |March 13th, 2017|Categories: Blog, Qi Gong|0 Comments

What is Qigong?

Dancing Crane # 10 of the 18 Luohan Hands   Qigong (pronounced chee kung) is an ancient Chinese mind body practice that restores wellness, builds mental and emotional strength, reduces stress and increases vitality.  Qigong is a branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and the grandfather of Tai Chi which was developed later for combat.  Qi (Pronounced Chee) is the circulating life force (or energy) whose existence and properties are the basis of much Chinese philosophy.   Qi flows through our bodies and everything in nature.  Gong is cultivation. Therefore, Qigong is energy cultivation. Qigong is a very powerful practice that works on the physical, emotional, and spiritual levels.

By |March 9th, 2017|Categories: Blog, Qi Gong|0 Comments